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Andrea Domínguez

Andrea Domínguez is a transborder student at San Diego City College. Her educational goals are to obtain an associate’s degree in sustainable urban agriculture and transfer to a 4-year university to earn a bachelor’s. As a transfronteriza she has witnessed border violence and the devastating effects of economic policies that have deepened the systemic inequalities and injustices working-class people have to endure. Over the years, Tijuana has become more and more a place of transit for people fleeing poverty and conflict in their home countries.
Her lived experiences, and being an activist on both sides of the border, has helped shaped her consciousness as well as her career aspirations. She hopes to become an educator and advocate for social and economic justice in the Tijuana-San Diego region.
She firmly believes education is a powerful tool to fight against all forms of oppression and towards a collective liberation for all. Before 2015, all of her previous education was in Mexico, so learning to navigate a different educational system and in another language was a struggle. The Students for Economic Justice Summer Fellowship is the culmination of all her hard work and dedication as a student. At the same time it’s the beginning of a new chapter in her academic and activist formation. She plans on using every skill she learns to bring awareness to issues affecting communities all over the county. She dares to dream that another world is possible, and the first step to bring change is to be at a place where silence ceases to exist.

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CPI San Diego
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Written by CPI San Diego

PLEDGE TO VOTE

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PLEDGE TO VOTE

MY VOTE COUNTS

5 County Supervisors get to decide how to spend over $6 billion dollars of public funds each year.

This election, we have the chance to elect 3 of the 5 Supervisors. Will you vote?