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    Center on Policy Initiatives

San Diego County Water Districts

The policy decisions made by water districts affect water access, affordability, equity, safety and resiliency. In San Diego County, water district boards and the San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) are responsible for provision and management of water supplies and services. The boards are made up of water, municipal water, and irrigation districts. The San Diego County Water Authority is managed by individuals appointed by member districts and municipalities that import water from the San Diego County Water Authority.

Policy decisions made by these boards will only become more important as climate change impacts become both more severe and more apparent. If the decisions made by the elected water boards are to be fully representative of the interests of the communities they serve, community members must have a voice in the process of decision-making. Water authorities need to hold competitive elections and take other steps to proactively and meaningfully engage community stakeholders. Finding solutions that address communities’ water needs, while mitigating the impacts of climate change and building equitable water access requires buy-in from the diverse interests in our region.

Table of Contents

Specifically water districts must develop or modify strategic/management plans to reflect the needs and interests of the communities they serve.  These plans need to identify expected impacts due to climate change, and outline mitigation strategies that are meant to ensure equitable water resiliency. Water resiliency is the capacity to manage water in the face of changing climate and water challenges- management of water to avoid flooding during high amounts of rain and water storage to access during periods of drought.1 

What will you find in this report?

Water Districts Map

This map shows the various water districts responsible for providing water, water management and decision making around water issues for the county.

Want to know which water district you are in? Use our Search bar feature in the map, and type in your address to find out which district you are in.

San Diego Water: Where Do We Get It?

In the past, 95% of the water in the San Diego region was imported from the Colorado River and Northern California water sources. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWDSC) was the region’s primary supplier. After an extreme drought in 1991 the MWDSC decreased water supply by 31%. As a result, the San Diego County Water Authority diversified the region’s water supply by increasing usage of local resources (i.e., groundwater), diversifying suppliers (i.e., direct purchasing agreements with other neighboring districts), and advancing the use of alternative technologies (i.e., recycled water, desalination, water conservation).

By 2018, only 32% of the region’s water was imported from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and this percentage is expected to continue to decrease over time. As water supplies continue to shift towards local water resources and climate change impacts increase, local level decision-making around water resources will become more important. Water boards must proactively engage community members and center community needs in these policy decisions.

California Water Resource Boards

The State of California manages water resources and decisions around the management and usage of those water resources through a State (CA) Water Resources Control Board (CAWRCB). The board was created in 1967 through state legislation and consists of five-members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the California State Senate. The California Water Resources Control Board is responsible for setting statewide policy, coordinating and supporting the regional water resource boards, and allocating surface water rights.

There are nine regional water resource control boards. San Diego has a regional control board (SD-R9), that consists of seven members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. These members serve four-year terms and hold regular public meetings. During these meetings decisions are made with the intent to collectively improve the water quality of the region, including drinking water. These state level entities help water suppliers to maintain compliance with federal and state water standards.

In San Diego County, there are currently 85 public water systems regulated through the California Water Resources Control Board. A public water system is defined as a system that provides drinking water to at least 15 service connections. Of those, 13% are out of compliance with federal and state level water quality standards for water consumption, with most being small systems located in rural areas of San Diego and expected to impact approximately 2,050 residents.

San Diego County Water Authority

The San Diego region’s water is managed through the San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA). The San Diego County Water Authority was created in 1946 primarily for the purpose of transporting Colorado River water to San Diego to supplement local water supplies and provide this water to its member agencies. Each member agency has representation on the San Diego County Water Authority board of directors.

Some municipalities have used Joint Power Agreements, or Agencies, (JPA) for the purpose of providing municipal services between two or more local agencies. The legal authority that facilitates the formation of a JPA is through Senate Bill No. 1266, Joint Exercise of Powers Act. Sweetwater Authority is the only water resource JPA discussed in this report.

Other areas are supplied water through a Mutual Water Company (MWC). These are private companies that provide public water services, specifically for their shareholders or customers, at cost. They are expected to maintain a functioning board who makes decisions about pricing agreements with water supply agencies (i.e., SDCWA). Board members are elected by the customers of each Mutual Water Company. There are nineteen Mutual Water Companies in San Diego County, with 42% of them being out of compliance with federal and state water quality standards. Mutual Water Companies are out of compliance at a higher rate than public water entities, and compared to public entities have greater problems providing quality water.

Otay Mesa Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Otay Water District (OWD) is a water, recycled water, and sewer service provider. The State Legislature authorized the establishment of the Otay Water District in 1956 as a California Special District. OWD is a “revenue neutral” public agency where each end user pays only his or her fair share of the District’s costs of acquiring, treating, transporting, or the operation and maintenance of the public water, recycled water, or sewer facilities within roughly 125 square miles of Southeastern San Diego County, consisting of the communities of Spring Valley, La Presa, Rancho San Diego, Jamul, eastern Chula Vista, and eastern Otay Mesa along the international border with Mexico. The potable water delivered by OWD is purchased from the San Diego County Water Authority, Helix Water District, or the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.

The Board of Directors sets rates for service, taxes, policies, ordinances and other matters related to the management and operation of the Otay Water District. The five Directors are elected by voters within their respective division boundaries and serve four-year terms.

Board website: https://otaywater.gov/board-of-directors/

 

Meeting Times: The Board typically meets in open public session on the 1st Wednesday of each month at 3:30 PM.

Meetings and Agendas: https://otaywater.gov/board-of-directors/agenda-and-minutes/board-agenda/

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $90,772

45.6% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 71% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan see Section 4.6: Climate Change illustrating the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. Specifically, the district outlines the potential impacts of climate change, as well as the water authority’s adaptation and mitigation plan. 

San Diego, City of

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

While the City of San Diego doesn’t have a specific water district, water resources and decisions about these resources are managed through the City’s Public Utilities. High level decision making is facilitated through the City Council and the Mayor.

Board Website: https://www.sandiego.gov/citycouncil

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sandiego.gov/city-clerk/officialdocs/council-agendas-minutes-results

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held weekly, on Tuesdays 

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sandiego.gov/city-clerk/officialdocs/council-agendas-minutes-results  

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times:  Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM.

Meetings & Agendas:  https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $75,456

41% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 48.7% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the city's water management plan see Chapter 5: Adaptation of the city level climate action plan, which illustrates the city’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

Sweetwater Authority (South Bay Irrigation District & National City)

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

In 1977, as a result of a public initiative, South Bay Irrigation District (SBID) and National City formed a joint powers public water agency, Sweetwater Authority. Sweetwater Authority manages and operates the water system, providing water to National City, western portions of Chula Vista and Bonita.

Sweetwater Authority's board of directors is composed of seven members. Five directors are elected by citizens of their geographic subdistrict. Two directors are appointed by the Mayor of National City, and are subject to City Council confirmation.

Board Website: http://www.sweetwater.org/35/Governing-Board

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held twice a month, on the 2nd & 4th Wednesday at 6:00PM

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $58,709

59% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 84% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about National City's water management plan see their climate action plan "Section A: Climate Change" and "A.2c. Effects and Impacts of Climate Change: Water Supply", which illustrates the city’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

To learn more about Sweetwater Authority's district level management plan see Section 9: Climate Change and Water Energy, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

Eastern Region

Borrego Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Borrego Water District was formed in 1962 to protect the groundwater resources of the Borrego Valley. The district was originally formed under Division 13 of the California Water Code as a California Water District (Ref. Sect. 34000 et seq of the Water Code). These provisions are specific to California Water Districts and differ from the statutory requirements of other water agencies formed under different enabling acts, such as Irrigation Districts, Municipal Water Districts, County Water Districts, cities and privately held utilities. The district is regulated by several other government entities including the State of California, the County of San Diego, California Regional Water Quality Board, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Borrego Water District has also developed its own rules and regulations, resolutions, policies, ordinances and internal administrative procedures, rates and fees. The Borrego Water District was originally a landowner voter district and converted to a “registered voter” district in 1981.

Elections to the board of directors are held every four years on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November in odd-numbered years. There are five directors elected “at-large” (district-wide) rather than by division, who serve a four-year term. Directors take office on the last Friday in November following the general election. Terms are staggered by two years such that three positions are open in one election year and two years thereafter, two positions are open.

The Board of Directors sets rates for service, taxes, policies, ordinances and other matters related to the management and operation of the Borrego Water District. The five directors are elected by voters within their respective division boundaries and serve four-year terms.

Board Website: https://www.borregowd.org/biographies/

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held every 2nd and 4th Tuesday at 9:00 AM at the District office, 806 Palm Canyon Drive, Borrego Springs.

Meeting Agendas: https://www.borregowd.org/agenda/

Borrego Water District is not a member of the SDCWA.

Median Income: $39,761

24.1% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 98.6% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about their ground water sustainability plan produced in collaboration with the County of San Diego see Land Use Goal 5: Climate Change and Land Use which illustrates the district’s and county’s expected plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

Canebrake Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

In 1965, the Canebrake County Water District was formed. The Canebrake County Water District currently services 79 meters with 30,000 lineal feet of piping. It maintains 2 wells and 2 storage tanks. A key characteristic and important tradition of the Canebrake County Water District is the volunteer support provided by community members to perform tasks large and small required to keep water flowing.

A five-member Board of Directors governs the Canebrake Water District, which provides potable water service within a small high-desert community south of the unincorporated east county community of Julian. Directors are elected by voters and serve four-year terms.

Board website: https://canebrakewater.specialdistrict.org/board-members

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held on the 2nd Saturday every other month with the exception being June instead of July at 9:00am at the Community Center at the district’s main location, 140 Smoketree Lane, Julian CA 92036.

Meetings & Agendas: https://canebrakewater.specialdistrict.org/board-meetings

Canebrake County Water District is not a member of the San Diego County Water Authority.

Median Income: $39,761

24.1% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 98.6% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

The district's level five-year management plan does not mention climate or climate change. This illustrates the district’s lack of a plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

Cuyamaca Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Cuyamaca Water District (CWD) was established in May, 1982 as a means to purchase an existing, privately owned, local water utility company. Acquisition of the utility company was completed in October, 1982. The CWD is among several water districts providing potable water service to the residents and businesses of the Lake Cuyamaca area. The service area consists of a 260.55 acres unincorporated area southeast of the town of Julian, California that borders Highway 79 along the north shore of Lake Cuyamaca. This area provides CWD’s revenue from flat rate charges for water used by the local residents and businesses.

The CWD board of directors consist of five-members, elected to four-year terms by the registered voters residing within the Cuyamaca Water District boundaries. Current Board members have all been appointed by San Diego County Board of Supervisors, even though these board members should be elected directly by represented community members.

Board website: http://www.cuyamacawaterdistrict.org/

 

Meeting Times: Board meeting are held on the 4th Monday of each month at 9am.

Meetings & Agendas: http://www.cuyamacawaterdistrict.org/

Cuyamaca Water District is not a member of the San Diego County Water Authority.

Median Income: $55,560

3.9% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 88.8% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

The Cuyamaca Water District did not have a publicly available district level management plan. This illustrates the district’s lack of a plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

Helix Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Helix Water District (HWD) was originally formed in 1885 as a special district formed by voters to provide a specific service (i.e., water). The Helix Water District is responsible for delivering water supply to the cities of La Mesa, Lemon Grove and El Cajon, along with the Spring Valley and Lakeside communities, and unincorporated areas of the East county region.

The Helix Water District is governed by a five-member board of directors, elected by the communities in which they reside, who oversee district policies and represent the Helix Water District in regional and state-level water resources management and policymaking. Each director is elected for a term of four years.

Board website: https://hwd.com/board/

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at 5:00 PM, and on the 4th Wednesday of the month at 3:00 PM. Board meetings are held at the Administration Office on 7811 University Avenue in La Mesa.

Meetings & Agendas: https://hwd.com/board-meetings/

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $68,899

28.7% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 67.9% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.3.1: Climate Change, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

Lakeside Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Lakeside Water District (LWD) was organized as the Lakeside Irrigation District in 1924. Its source of water was ground water and a connection to the Cuyamaca Water Company. The District’s function was primarily as an agricultural water provider. In 1980, the District changed its name to the Lakeside Water District. In 2006 Lakeside and Riverview Water Districts consolidated. LWD serves approximately 14 square miles of the unincorporated community of Lakeside, including the areas of Eucalyptus Hills, Moreno Valley, Muth Valley and Wintergardens.

The powers of the District are vested in a Board of Directors consisting of five members who are chosen by voters from five separate divisions. The Directors choose the officers, management staff, attorney, secretary and establish procedures for the employment of all personnel. They fix policies and procedures which relate to the actions taken by and the services rendered by the District.

Board website: https://lakesidewater.org/board-of-directors/

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are once a month typically on the 1st Tuesday of each month at 5:30 PM at the district office, located at 10375 Vine Street, Lakeside, CA 92040.

Meetings & Agendas: https://lakesidewater.org/board-of-directors/agendas-minutes/

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 


 

Median Income: $ 78,038

14.5% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 69.7% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3, subsection 3.2.2 Climate, which describes the district's climate and some general climate trends that impact water management and usage. 

Padre Dam Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Padre Dam Municipal Water District provides water, wastewater, recycled water and park and recreation services to over 100,000 residents in the East San Diego County communities of Santee, El Cajon, Lakeside, Flinn Springs, Harbison Canyon, Blossom Valley, Alpine, Dehesa and Crest. The District is a public agency governed by a five-member Board of Directors, each representing a geographic area within the district. Directors are elected by the voters within their divisions for four-year staggered terms.

Board website: https://www.padredam.org/86/Board-of-Directors

 

Meeting Times: The Board of Directors Regular Meetings are held the first and third Wednesday of the month at 3:30 pm at 9300 Fanita Parkway in Santee.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.padredam.org/269/Agendas-Minutes

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Median Income: $98,645

14% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 56.7% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.3.1 Climate Change, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

North Coastal

Carlsbad Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Carlsbad is a unique district, in that the board of directors is also the city council. The City Council consists of an elected mayor and four elected council members. Each serves a four-year term. The city is in the process of transitioning to a system where City Council members are elected by district instead of at large or citywide.

Board website: https://www.carlsbadca.gov/cityhall/officials/default.asp

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays, and are currently accessible online.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.carlsbadca.gov/cityhall/meetingsandagendas.asp

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $103,091

17.7% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 49.7% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan see Section 3.4.1Climate Action Plan and Energy Intensity of Water System and subsection 3.4.2 “Climate Change Vulnerability Analysis, which illustrate the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

Camp Pendleton Military Reservation

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Camp Pendleton’s water resources are managed directly by the United States Marine Corps, Water Resources Division: Assistant Chief of Staff Facilities.

Board Website: https://www.pendleton.marines.mil/Staff-Agencies/Assistant-Chief-of-Staff-G-F/Water-Resources-Division/

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents  

Median Income: $42,061

9.3% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 75.7% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

The district level management plan does not mention climate nor climate change. This illustrates the leadership’s lack of planning to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

 

City of Del Mar

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

While the City of Del Mar doesn’t have a specific water district, water resources and decisions about these resources are managed through the City’s Public Utilities, with high-level decision-making being facilitated through City Council.

Board Website: http://www.delmar.ca.us/142/City-Council

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held the 1st and 3rd Mondays.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.delmar.ca.us/AgendaCenter/City-Council-12

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 


Meeting Times: Monthly board meetings take place on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $110,966

7.7% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 90.1% speak an "Indo-European" langauge.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the city's water management plan see Chapter 4 Adaptation, Section 4.2 Climate Change Projections, and Section 4.5 Water Availability of their climate action plan, which illustrate the city’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate, specifically as it relates to water availability.

City of Oceanside

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

While the City of Oceanside doesn’t have a specific water district, water resources and decisions about these resources are managed through the City’s Water Utilities, with high-level decision-making being facilitated through City Council.

Board Website: https://www.ci.oceanside.ca.us/gov/council/default.asp

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held the 1st and 3rd Wednesdays.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.ci.oceanside.ca.us/gov/council/agenda.asp

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Monthly board meetings take place on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $110,966

32% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 63.1% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about how the city plans to deal with climate change see Section 3.3 Climate Change of their water management plan and Trend 6 Increased Risk Profile of their water utilities strategic plan. These plans discuss the expected risks associated with continuing climate change, as well as potential departmental responses. 

Olivehain Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Olivenhain Municipal Water District is a public agency providing water, wastewater services, recycled water, hydroelectricity, and the operation of Elfin Forest Recreational Reserve. Olivehain Municipal Water District serves approximately Encinitas, Carlsbad, San Diego, San Marcos, Solana Beach, and neighboring communities. The District is governed by a five-member Board of Directors elected for staggered four-year terms, with each director being elected from a specific geographic area of the District’s service area.

Board Website: https://www.olivenhain.com/about-us/governing-board/

 

Meeting Times: One to two board meetings are generally held each month at 4:00PM.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.olivenhain.com/about-us/governing-board/board-meetings/

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $126,419

21.2% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 33.3% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district’s water management plan see Goal 4 of their 2020 Strategic Plan. The district's Goal 4 is "To pursue alternative and renewable energy sources as a means of offsetting costs and energy charges, providing sustainability." 

 

San Dieguito Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The San Dieguito Water District provides potable (drinking) and recycled water to the communities of Leucadia, Old Encinitas, Cardiff, and portions of New Encinitas. The remainder of the City is served by the Olivenhain Municipal Water District. The San Dieguito Water District is a subsidiary district of the City of Encinitas. The Mayor of Encinitas and City Council serve as Board Members of the San Dieguito Water District.

Board website: https://encinitasca.gov/Government/Elected-Officials

 

Meeting Times: The City Council typically meets on the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Wednesday of each month for regular Council meetings at 6:00 PM. San Dieguito Water District meets monthly, on the 3rd Wednesday at 5:00 PM. Meetings are held at the City of Encinitas - City Council Chambers, 505 S. Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, California 92024.

Meetings & Agendas: https://encinitasca.gov/Government/Agendas-Webcasts

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $109,971

15.9% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 65.4% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan,  see Section 3.3.1 Climate Change, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate. 

Santa Fe Irrigation District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Santa Fe Irrigation District (SFID) is a potable water and recycled water service provider for residents in the City of Solana Beach as well as the unincorporated communities of Rancho Santa Fe and Fairbanks Ranch. The five-member Board of Directors are elected for four-year terms. Each Director represents a geographical division of the service area and are selected by voters in the November general election in even-numbered years.

Board Website: https://www.sfidwater.org/151/Board-of-Directors

 

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $128,448

18.8% of the population speak a language other than English at home, of those 46.9% speak Spanish.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the  district's water management plan, see Chapter 9 Climate Change and Water-Energy, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

North Inland

Coachella Valley Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Policies

Coachella Valley Water District (CVWD) is a multifaceted agency that delivers irrigation and domestic (drinking) water, collects and recycles wastewater, provides regional storm water protection, replenishes the groundwater basin and promotes water conservation. The portion of this district that is in San Diego County is uninhabited and lies fully in Anza-Borrego State Park. Coachella Valley Water District is governed by a five-member Board of Directors, each of whom is elected to four-year terms by district voters, as required by the Riverside County Registrar of Voters.

Board Website: https://www.cvwd.org/150/Board-of-Directors

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are regularly held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month. Because of COVID19, meetings will be streamed live on the District’s website at http://cvwd.org/151/Board-Agendas.

Meetings & Agendas: http://cvwd.org/151/Board-Agendas

Meeting information is in English and Spanish, however, actual agenda items are in English only.

The portion of the Coachella Valley Water District located in San Diego County is uninhabited and consists solely of land located inside of Anza-Borrego State Park.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.3.2: Climate Change which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

City of Escondido

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

While the City of Escondido doesn’t have a specific water district, water resources and decisions about these resources are managed through the City’s Water Division, with high-level decision-making being facilitated through City Council.

Board Website: https://www.escondido.org/city-council.aspx

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held the first four Wednesdays, monthly.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.escondido.org/meeting-agendas.aspx

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Monthly board meetings take place on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $62,319

46% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 85.2% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

The city's climate action plan, discusses climate change across multiple management areas. See Section 4.5 Water which discusses water management strategies and illustrates the city’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate and its effects on water supply.

Fallbrook Public Utility District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Fallbrook Public Utility District (FPUD) was established in 1922 to provide access to San Luis Rey Watershed groundwater resources to wells that served about 500 acres in the Fallbrook area. Fifteen years later, the Fallbrook Irrigation District was dissolved with a majority becoming part of the FPUD. This helped the Fallbrook Public Utility District to become a charter member of SDCWA in 1944, which allowed the FPUD to access water from the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. In the 1950s FPUD begin expanding its control of water resources, including a federal lawsuit for access to water needed for Camp Pendleton. In the 1990s, two other districts dissolved, DeLuz Heights Municipal Water District and Fallbrook Sanitary District, transferring services and water resource rights to the Fallbrook Public Utilities District.

The Fallbrook Public Utilities District’s board is governed by five directors who serve overlapping 4-year terms. Each director is elected by the registered voters of each subdistrict.

Board Website: https://www.fpud.com/board-members

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held on the 4th Monday of each month, with agenda items from the public having to be made in advance through the board secretary.

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Monthly board meetings take place on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $70,097

28.9% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 86.3% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.3: Service Area Climate, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

 

Mootamai Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Mootamai Municipal Water District is a non-operating water district, which provides fire services only. It is currently managed as a part of Yuima Municipal Water District and Pauma Valley Water Company.

Median Income: $85,250

19.2% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 85% speak Spanish at home.
Mootamai is a non-operating municipal water district and as a result does not have a water management plan.

Pauma Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies
Pauma Municipal Water District is a non-operating water district, currently managed as a part of Yuima Municipal Water District and Pauma Valley Water Company.

Median Income: $85,250

19.2% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 85% speak Spanish at home.

Pauma is a non-operating municipal water district and as a result does not have a water management plan.

City of Poway

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The City of Poway operates and maintains the community's water utility systems. Raw water is purchased from the San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) and treated at the city-owned and operated Lester J. Berglund Water Treatment Plant, then distributed to all Poway customers. Several hundred acre-feet of reclaimed water is purchased annually from the City of San Diego for landscape irrigation at the South Poway Business Park. The city council of the City of Poway appoints one San Diego County Water Authority representative.

Board Website: https://poway.org/163/City-Council

 

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $105,732

26% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 44.2% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the city's water management plan, see Section 3.5 Climate Change, which illustrates the city’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate and its effects on water supply.

 

Questhaven Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Questhaven Municipal Water District is a small district that relies on groundwater to supply a 1-square-mile service just west of Escondido. The district has an estimated population of 4, plus guests at the Questhaven Retreat, a private residential facility run by a religious group that practices Christian mysticism. 

Board Website: https://www.questhaven.org/home/

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

The Questhaven Municipal Water District did not have a publicly available district level management plan. This illustrates the district’s lack of planning to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

Rainbow Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Rainbow Municipal Water District (RMWD) was established in 1953 and is a Special District, organized under Section 71000 of the California Water Code. Rainbow Municipal Water District is a member of the San Diego County Water Authority. The District provides water and sanitation services to the unincorporated communities of Rainbow, Bonsall, and portions of Vista, Oceanside and Fallbrook. All of the District's water is imported from two locations: the Lake Skinner Water Treatment Plant in Hemet and the Twin Oaks Valley Water Treatment Plant in San Marcos.

The Rainbow Municipal Water District’s board is comprised of a five-member elected board representing divisions selected by voters in the November general election in even-numbered years.

Board Website: https://www.rainbowmwd.com/your-board-of-directors

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held on the 4th Tuesday of each month, with Open Session starting at 1:00pm

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $86,774

22% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 75.3% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 4.6: Climate Change – Influence on Water Demands, and Section 6.5, Climate Change – Influence on Water Supply, which illustrate the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

Ramona Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Ramona Municipal Water District (RMWD) was formed on August 15, 1956, as a municipal water district. Organized under Water Code Section 71000, Ramona Municipal Water District provides water, sewer, recycled water, fire protection, emergency medical services and park services. The Ramona Municipal Water District service area encompasses the Santa Maria Valley and surrounding hills.

Ramona Municipal Water District is governed by a five-member board of directors that serve staggered four-year terms of office, representing five geographical divisions.

Board Website: https://www.rmwd.org/board-of-directors

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 2:00PM

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $103,433

17% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 74% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.3: Climate, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with general climate trends. 

Rincon del Diablo Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Policies

Rincon del Diablo Municipal Water District (RDMWD) exists to reliably deliver quality water to meet the needs of Rincon Water’s residents, businesses, municipalities, and fire response services.

Rincon del Diablo Municipal Water District is a public agency governed by a five-member Board of Directors, each representing a geographic area within the District. Directors are elected by the voters within their divisions for four-year staggered terms and are elected in even numbered years.

Board Website: https://rinconwater.org/governance/board-of-directors/

 


Meeting Times: Meetings are typically held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of each month, at 5:00PM

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $83,089

30.5% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 74.3% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore, it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

While the most recent publicly available district level strategic plan, mentions both climate and climate change it does not include specifics about how the district's plan mitigates for climate change.

San Luis Rey Indian Water Authority

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The San Luis Rey Indian Water Authority(SLRIWA) is a sovereign tribal entity, created by the La Jolla, Pala, Pauma, Rincon and San Pasqual Bands. The San Luis Rey Indian Water Authority was formed to protect, develop and manage the resources provided under the San Luis Rey Indian Rights Water Settlement.

In 1969, Pala, Pauma, Rincon, San Pasqual and La Jolla Indian tribes sued the City of Escondido, the Vista Irrigation District and the federal government for illegally diverting water away from the tribes. In 1980, a partial summary judgment upheld their position.

A 1988 settlement was reached that included $30 million of compensation under the San Luis Rey Indian Water Rights Settlement Act (Public Law 100-675). The funds were designated for economic development and for operation of the San Luis Rey Indian Water Authority. The settlement also entitled the San Luis Rey Indian Water Authority to over 5 billion gallons of water annually from the Colorado River to compensate for water diverted from the five tribes for over 100 years.

Despite the settlement continued litigation delayed access to the water until 2017.2 As part of the settlements the San Luis Rey Indian Water Authority agreed to sell excess water to the cities of Escondido and Vista. 

Board Website: https://www.slriwa.org/about/board-of-directors

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held and decided on as needed by board members.

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

In recognition of the fact that this water authority is the result of a history of stolen land and broken treaties, they do not have the same dynamics around governance and representation as the other water districts.

Median Income: $71,375

Eighteen percent of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people, 85% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

There is no recent, publicly available district level strategic or water management plan.

San Luis Rey Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The San Luis Rey Municipal Water District is governed by an elected five-member board. Throughout the year, the San Luis Rey Municipal directors make decisions pertaining to issues that impact water, land, and the environment. 

Board Website: https://sanluisreymwd.specialdistrict.org/board-members

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held on the 3rd Wednesday of each month, at 4:00PM

District Area (square miles):  Median Income: $85,250

Nineteen percent of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people, 85.0% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

There is no recent, publicly available district level strategic/water management plan. This illustrates the district’s lack of planning to mitigate any issues that are arise as a direct result of a changing climate.

Vallecitos Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Vallecitos Water District (VWD) provides water, wastewater, and reclamation services to San Marcos; the community of Lake San Marcos; parts of Carlsbad, Escondido and Vista and other unincorporated areas in north San Diego County. Vallecitos Water District was founded as the San Marcos County Water District (SMCWD) in 1955 by a group of local citizens to answer the shrinking water table in the San Marcos and Twin Oaks valleys. In May of 1989, the San Marcos County Water District changed its name to the Vallecitos Water District, which currently serves a 45-square-mile boundary.

The Vallecitos Water District's board of directors is composed of 5 elected members representing five divisions, or service areas. Members are elected to four-year terms.

Board Website: http://www.vwd.org/departments/board-of-directors

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held every 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month at 5:00PM

San Diego County Water Authority Members

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $83,575

29.2% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 71.3% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.1 Climate, which illustrates the district’s plan to mitigate and address general climate trends and the impacts to the governed water resource.

Valley Center Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Valley Center Municipal Water District (VCMWD) was formed in 1954, and connected with the San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA) and Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWDSC) the following year. The Valley Center Municipal Water District is governed by an elected five-member board representing voters within sub districts. Board members serve four-year terms.

Board Website: http://www.vcmwd.org/Board/Board-of-Directors

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Mondays of each month at 2:00PM

San Diego County Water Authority Board Members

 


Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $ 89,494

20% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 69.9% speak Spanish at home.

The District’s Urban Water Management Plan (2015), illustrates the district’s commitment to addressing climate change as part of its planning strategy.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.3: Service Area Climate, and Section 6.10: Climate Change Impacts to Supply, which illustrate the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

Vista Irrigation District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Vista Irrigation District (VID) is an independent special district formed to provide water to the City of Vista, portions of San Marcos, Escondido, Oceanside, and unincorporated areas of the northern San Diego County region. It was originated in 1923, and mostly served agricultural interests until 1955 when drought and residential development increased.

Vista Irrigation District decision-making is managed by a five-member governing board, whom are elected to four-year terms.

Board Website: https://www.vidwater.org/board-of-directors-0cd80e4

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are generally held on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month, at 9:00AM

San Diego County Water Authority Members

 

Meeting Times: Board meetings are held once a month, on the 4th Thursday, at 9:00 AM, and are open to the public.

Meetings & Agendas: https://www.sdcwa.org/meetings-and-documents

Median Income: $71,709

33.0% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 81.6% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

To learn more about the district's water management plan, see Section 3.5: Climate, and Section 4.6: Climate Change, which illustrate the district’s plan to mitigate any issues that are associated directly with a changing climate.

Wynola Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

Wynola Water District provides water to a population of about 87 people in a district that is just under half a square mile, according to the Local Agency Formation Commission. The district relies solely on local groundwater to provide service to its customers, all of whom live within Wynola Estates, a small residential development in an unincorporated area of East County, west of Julian.

Wynola Water District’s board of directors is composed of 5 elected members.

Board Website: https://wynolawaterdistrict.com/

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are generally held quarterly, on a Saturday, at 10:00AM

Median Income: $55,560

3.9% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 88.8% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

There is no recent, publicly available district level strategic/water management plan. This illustrates the district’s lack of planning to mitigate any issues that are arise as a direct result of a changing climate. 

Yuima Municipal Water District

  • District Governance
  • Demographics
  • Climate Change Strategies

The Yuima Municipal Water District (YMWD) was created in 1963. The water district imports water from the Colorado River to areas in the Pauma Valley (Palomar Mutual Water Company later known as Improvement District "A"; Rancho Estates Mutual Water Company; Rancho Pauma Mutual Water Company; and Lazy H Mutual Water Company) to augment their local water supplies. 

The Yuima Municipal Water District’s board of directors is composed of 5 elected members.

Board Website: https://www.yuimamwd.com/newdev/board-directors

 

Meeting Times: Meetings are generally held the fourth Monday of each month, at 2:00PM.

Median Income: $84,919

19.4% of the population speak a language other than English at home. Of those people 86.0% speak Spanish at home.

Water district boards have decision-making power and play a critical role in facilitating equitable water access. Water access is an increasingly critical issue in the face of our ever changing climate and the threats it poses for water resiliency. Therefore it is imperative that districts specifically plan for climate change related water challenges.

There is no recent, publicly available district level strategic/water management plan. This illustrates the district’s lack of planning to mitigate any issues that are arise as a direct result of a changing climate. 

Methodology

The data used in this report to describe the various water associated districts came from multiple sources.

Districts profiled were chosen based on membership of San Diego County Water Authority and/or have profiles with San Diego County Local Agency Formation Commissions (LAFCO). The LAFCO were established in 1963 and are political subdivisions of the State of California responsible for providing regional growth management services in all 58 counties, which includes formation of Irrigation, Water, and Municipal Water Districts. More information about the LAFCO and the districts: https://www.sdlafco.org/agencies/special-districts

Information identifying districts’ board members came directly from each individual district’s website, except election 2020 information. Election 2020 information was collected directly from the San Diego County Registrar of Voters: November 2020 Candidates List and is publicly available.

The “Climate Change/Action Strategy” is a key component to help community members relate water district decision-making power with a district’s willingness to publicly identify climate as important to water management. Each district’s website was searched for one or all of three things: strategic plan, urban water management plan, and/or other planning document. A keyword search was performed on any of the located planning documents. All findings were reported, specifically which document and where within the document the reported findings are located.

The demographic information used to describe the districts are calculated from the US Census, American Community Survey, 2018 5-year estimates. Data at the census tract level was aggregated and used to estimate district level demographics. Portions of some census tracts are part of more than one water district, thus estimates of population demographics in affected water districts may minimally overestimate population demographics. However, this issue affected a very small number of districts, and doesn’t seem to be significantly impacting district estimates.

Written by CPI San Diego

PLEDGE TO VOTE

MY VOTE COUNTS

5 County Supervisors get to decide how to spend over $6 billion dollars of public funds each year.

This election, we have the chance to elect 3 of the 5 Supervisors. Will you vote?

PLEDGE TO VOTE

MY VOTE COUNTS

5 County Supervisors get to decide how to spend over $6 billion dollars of public funds each year.

This election, we have the chance to elect 3 of the 5 Supervisors. Will you vote?