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    Center on Policy Initiatives

Lowell Waxman

Lowell brings to his service on the CPI board his experience gained over 45 years of multi-issue political activism in San Diego. With the Campaign for Economic Democracy in the 1970s work focused on jobs from development of solar energy in California, accountable downtown redevelopment to include affordable housing, support for the United Farm Workers, divestment from apartheid South Africa, district elections and corporate accountability. Lowell worked for the United Domestic Workers of America for three years in its formative years. Other major activist activities include his work for the Central America Information Center and with Neighbor to Neighbor in the Prop 186 fight for single payer health care in California.

As a CPI volunteer, Lowell created the first CPI website and has contributed photography to help tell tell the story of the struggle for economic justice in San Diego. He is a retired librarian with the San Diego Public Library where he worked in numerous San Diego communities. Lowell studied industrial and labor relations at Cornell University; majored in English and received a BA from Long Island University in Brooklyn; and, earned his Masters in Librarianship from the University of Denver. Lowell grew up in New York and credits his passion for building a multicultural society based on economic and social justice to his foundational summer camp experiences which brought vital early exposure to the ban-the bomb, civil rights and labor movements to help him envision a world of grander possibilities.

 

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CPI San Diego
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Written by CPI San Diego

PLEDGE TO VOTE

MY VOTE COUNTS

5 County Supervisors get to decide how to spend over $6 billion dollars of public funds each year.

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PLEDGE TO VOTE

MY VOTE COUNTS

5 County Supervisors get to decide how to spend over $6 billion dollars of public funds each year.

This election, we have the chance to elect 3 of the 5 Supervisors. Will you vote?